Authenticity, Life Stuff, Main Genre: Adult Fable, posts

“The Good Dog with No Confidence” (an Adult Fable)

There once was a dog who was so good he became known only as “Good Boy.” He knew he had another name at the vet and the groomer, but he cherished this second name above all else — for he loved being a “good boy” in the tough world in which he and his human dad, “Hooman,” lived.

One day, Good Boy saw that Hooman was watching some type of video on his screen. The movie was talking about something called “confidence” that Good Boy had never heard of.

It talked about how, if you have confidence, it means you know you have something to offer.

Good Boy was astonished. Hooman had been through so much. Maybe that’s why Hooman could not feel this “confidence”? Maybe because Hooman had been through rough times, he could not always be confident, like the video talked about.

Or maybe if he had it, he just didn’t show it.

But Good Boy knew Hooman was still a good person and had a good heart. Good Boy knew what was good. Hooman fed and cared for him and other people. Hooman worked hard and was honest.

Good Boy did not understand why this “confidence” mattered more than what was in Hooman’s heart.

Even worse….Good Boy did not think he had confidence himself. He had never even heard of it before! He thought in horror, “Does that mean I am not really a good boy?

MORAL: When it comes to others, look at their heart and goodness. These matter above all else.

 

{More fables for adults}

 

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Fable, Fantasy, Flash Fiction, Life Stuff, Microfiction, Wisdom

Not Afraid…”Cautious”

Micro-Story: The unicorn mare rushed to its mother. “I don't think it's a good idea,” she said. “But I don't always want to be afraid.” | Its mom replied, “You're not afraid this time,” she said. “You're cautious — there's a difference.”

People are quick to label something as “fear” — but people also confuse caution and fear — which can be two very different things.

 

Words can be very subtle — and often the subtleties cause issues when put together with our hasty ideas.

For example, You may doubt something (or someone) because you have facts that add up to something not working out. You may be cautious because of similar situations that don’t pan out. There are any number of actual reasons for caution — which makes it not a fear-based reaction but a rational train of thought that simply doesn’t lead to a good end.

So yes, fear can be dangerous if it paralyzes us for no reason — but when there’s a reason, it may be more a healthy dose of caution than anything else.

 

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